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Mountain Biking Techniques

In the world of Mountain Biking, cornering has a major impact in a rider’s aptitude set and general capacity on the trail. You’re cornering position is the one that will give you the most extreme pick up of time. In the event that you figure out how to totally coordinate the development instinctually, you will have the capacity to toss the bicycle around right away with huge amounts of grasp. Truly cornering is only a progression of developments that, when assembled, help you turn speedier and with more adjust and certainty.

1. SET YOUR SPEED

A moving tire has more footing and in this manner gives you more control than a braking or sliding tire. Before taking a corner, you ought to solicit yourself what sort from corner you are drawing closer and after that change your you’re braking methods. Brake before you go in the turn. Your speed ought to have diminished such, that it is a bit much any longer to brake in the corner.

2. USING BOTH THE FRONT AND BACK BRAKE

Do not use your front brake in a corner. You should complete all of your braking before entering the corner. Some people prefer to use the back brake to stop them being thrown over the front handlebars, but theoretically, if you weight is correctly positioned across the bike then there is no problem using both.

3. TURN WITH YOUR HIPS

Cornering is all about getting your hips moving around the bike. Add more intention by turning your hips into the corner. It’s not a bus, it’s a bike, so get your whole body into it! Rotate your hips so that your belly button points where you want to go and remember to look through the turn rather than focusing on your front wheel.

4. GEARING

If you’re not going to pedal around the corner, before going into it, shift to the gear you want to use for pedaling out of the corner. Keeping tight slightly applying the brakes to slow down a bit and shifting to a lower gear. Simply speaking on approach look for the apex, correct your speed and get the right gear for exit.

5. BODY POSITION

Keep your body vertical. Tilt the bike, not your body while cornering so that you can intuitively counter steer if your front tire loses grip. get low and initiate the turn with your hips. Support your weight with your legs and try to keep your hands light so you can lean the bike.

6. KEEP YOUR HEAD UP TO PICK YOUR LINE

keep your head up and look to the exit of the turn. The more you read the trail ahead of you, the faster you can go while planning your next line. For beginner riders this invariably means that you tend head straight for it.